Corporate vs Political: Who Has The Most Power?

In evaluating the question, corporate vs political: who has the most power? I would point to the fact that for the individual working for a corporate entity, it is his, or her, corporate bosses that control far more of that individual’s life. The corporation becomes the tribe that the individual belongs to and tribal affiliations are far stronger than political persuasions; which only flair up every four or five years. Political power is the more overt form of power; it is widely discussed in the media, and those who choose to be part of the political process vote for their representatives at election time. Corporate power is assumed and far more covert in its influence and control over the individual who works for a particular corporation.

In the American political sphere, at this time, we see Donald Trump, a successful, high profile, corporate CEO appearing to win over the hearts and minds of American conservative voters. Is this a transmutation, or consolidation, of corporate power from the private sector to the public sector? Is corporate America flexing its muscles in the political realm in a highly overt way, after years of lobbying through the normal political channels? At the community level corporations exert power through campaign donations to elected representatives, through their market share, their influence over their employees and stock holders, and through paid lobbyists. Corporate influence is very persuasive throughout the US political system, and in most other western democratic forms of government. Corporate websites do not reflect this; they are smokescreens of demure behaviour in the digital realm.

Corporate vs Political: Who Has The Most Power?

In these capitalist, free enterprise, systems the individual is compelled to seek gainful employment to feed himself, or herself, and any family they may produce. Working for the man, which may in this day and age be a corporate entity, is first and foremost the most important allegiance owed. Ideas about state and country, except in times of national war, are secondary to the loyalty and fealty directly owed to their employer. Political power is overrated in most western democracies in terms of its influence over its constituents. Presidents and Congressmen are figureheads, when the real power handlers are the bosses and corporate leaders making the decisions that daily affect the lives of their workers, customers and stock holders.

The democratic system is an ideal that rarely delivers on its overblown promises and windbag filled media coverage. In all likelihood, if Donald Trump is elected President of the United States, he will have demonstrably less power than before he entered the race for the White House.